Restoring the lost mammals of central Australia at Newhaven Wildlife Sanctuary

Newhaven Wildlife Sanctuary is set to host a project of global biodiversity significance – the establishment of a massive feral cat-free area covering at least 650 square kilometres (65,000 hectares). This will be the planet’s largest feral cat eradication project.

The first stage of the Newhaven project (8,000 - 15,000 ha) will create a refuge for large, wild populations of at least 10 nationally threatened mammal species including the Mala (currently extinct in the wild), the Central Rock Rat and the Golden Bandicoot.

This project is unique - for the first time, a vast landscape in central Australia will once again be home to a diversity and abundance of mammals similar to that which existed prior to the arrival of European settlers.

Read more about the Newhaven Feral Eradication Project

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The Mala, or Rufous Hare-wallaby, is one of Australia’s most endangered mammals

The return of endangered mammals

Species

Approx global population* (Mammal Action Plan)

Predicted Newhaven population

Increase in global population

Mala (Rufous Hare-wallaby)

4,000

18,000

450%

Black-footed Rock-wallaby**

<10,000

1,500

15%

Burrowing Bettong

15,000

22,500

150%

Brush-tailed Bettong

<18,000

9,000

50%

Golden Bandicoot

>10,000

32,500

100%+

Greater Bilby

<10,000

4,500

45%

Central Rock Rat

<1,000

1,825

180%

Western Quoll

<15,000

650

4%

Red-tailed Phascogale

<10,000

2,500

25%

Southern Marsupial Mole**

Unknown

Unknown

Unknown

Mammal reintroductions at Newhaven: preliminary predicted population size (65,000 ha)
* including other AWC sanctuaries | **small population persists at Newhaven

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Early explorers reported “countless swarms” of the now threatened Black-footed Rock-wallaby.

Please help implement the world’s largest feral cat eradication projectand restore the lost mammals of central Australia

With your support, AWC will implement the planet’s largest feral cat eradication project and help our threatened mammals once again reclaim a massive landscape in the heart of central Australia.

 

The estimated population statistics highlight the sheer scale of what will be achieved at Newhaven. However, there is more to this project than the unprecedented increase in endangered mammal populations. The return of digging mammals such as the Bilby and the Brush-tailed Bettong, and native carnivores such as the Western Quoll, will re-establish ecosystem processes that stalled many decades ago in central Australia. Species will be saved and a landscape in our red centre will be restored in a powerful demonstration of how practical, science-based action can halt the loss of Australia’s wildlife.

 

Stage 1 of the Newhaven project will involve the establishment of a feral predator-free area of 8,000 – 15,000 hectares by the end of 2017. The conservation fence around Stage 1 will extend for approximately 50 kilometres. AWC estimates the total cost of Stage 1, including fence construction, infrastructure development and feral animal eradication, will be $3 million. Stage 2 is estimated to cost an additional $5 million.

 

The Australian Government has announced it will make an initial investment of $750,000. AWC must therefore raise an additional $2.25 million for Stage 1.

 

Please help by making a tax deductible donation here