Numbats translocated to Mt Gibson Wildlife Sanctuary

Numbats translocated to Mt Gibson Wildlife Sanctuary
Sanctuaries
Mt Gibson | Scotia
Field Program
Wildlife translocations
Wildlife
Numbat | Greater Bilby | Greater Stick-nest Rat | Woylie | Western Barred Bandicoot | Shark Bay Mouse | Banded Hare-wallaby | Western Quoll / Chuditch

Australian Wildlife Conservancy (AWC) has successfully translocated 21 Numbats to Mt Gibson Wildlife Sanctuary. The translocations significantly boost the population of this endangered species at Mt Gibson and will play a critical role in preventing the extinction of one of Australia’s rarest mammals.

Dec 2016: Australian Wildlife Conservancy (AWC) has successfully translocated 21 Numbats to Mt Gibson Wildlife Sanctuary. The translocations significantly boost the population of this endangered species at Mt Gibson and will play a critical role in preventing the extinction of one of Australia’s rarest mammals. 

Seven Numbats for translocation were captured from within the 8,000-hectare feral predator free area at AWC’s Scotia Wildlife Sanctuary’s in western NSW (the largest feral cat-free area on mainland Australia). The remaining 14 were sourced from Perth Zoo’s Native Species Breeding Program - part of a Department of Parks and Wildlife’s species recovery program.

“AWC currently protects over 30% of the global Numbat population.”

Watch ABC TV News coverage of the translocation here.

Before their translocation each Numbat underwent a health check, which included having DNA samples collected. These samples will assist ecologists managing the genetic diversity of the Numbat population and the checks in general ensure we secure a strong founding population. The Numbats were also fitted with radio transmitting collars, which will enable the animals to be tracked after release.

The Numbats from Scotia were transported via charter flight direct to Mt Gibson while the animals from Perth made the journey by road.

“Mt Gibson contains the largest feral predator-free area on mainland Western Australia.”

Numbats are a diurnal species, meaning they are only active during the day, so the translocations from both Scotia and Perth Zoo were carefully planned to enable the Numbats to be released to individual nest sites (tree hollows), within the largest fox and cat-free area on mainland Western Australia, in the late afternoon. The Numbats will now be monitored via tracking of their radio-collars.

The Numbat – WA’s faunal emblem – is at high risk of extinction with an estimated population of less than 1,000 adults.

"The Numbat population at Mt Gibson is expected to grow to around 240 Numbats as a result of this and similar translocations – increasing the global Numbat population by almost 25%."  

These recent translocations form part of the Mt Gibson Endangered Wildlife Restoration Project that will reintroduce nine of Australia’s most endangered mammal species to Mt Gibson - the Bilby, Numbat, Woylie, Western Barred Bandicoot, Shark Bay Mouse, Red-tailed Phascogale, Greater Stick-nest Rat, Banded Hare-wallaby and Chuditch.

Read the ABC News online story about the Numbat translocation here.

Read the ABC News online story about the radio-collaring of Numbats at Perth Zoo here.