Science Advisory Network

Thomas Lovejoy
Thomas Lovejoy

Thomas E Lovejoy is one of the world’s most eminent conservation biologists who coined the term “biological diversity” and conceived the idea of “debt for nature swaps”. Spanning the political spectrum, Lovejoy has served on science and environmental councils under the Reagan, Bush and Clinton administrations.  He has also served as Assistant Secretary for Environmental and External Affairs for the Smithsonian Institution and Chief Biodiversity Advisor to the World Bank. Thomas's formal contribution to conservation in Australia began when he advised a special subcommittee of Cabinet led by Prime Minister John Howard in the late 1990’s.  He is a founding member of the Science Advisory Network for Australian Wildlife Conservancy and over the last decade has visited AWC properties in the Kimberley, the Top End, Cape York and the Gulf of Carpentaria, providing advice and leadership to AWC’s science team. He has served on Australian Government Committees and is a valued advisor to a range of Australian scientists and policy-makers. 

In 2001, Lovejoy was awarded the prestigious Tyler Prize for Environmental Achievement.  In 2009 he was appointed Conservation Fellow by the National Geographic Society.  In 2012 he received the Blue Planet Prize.  Lovejoy holds B.S. and Ph.D (biology) degrees from Yale University.  In 2010 he was elected professor in the Department of Environmental Science and Policy at George Mason University.   

Chris Johnson
Chris Johnson

Chris Johnson is a wildlife ecologist currently based at the University of Tasmania, where he is Professor of Wildlife Conservation. He studies pure and applied ecology, the causes of extinction, the effects of species extinction on ecological processes, and the environmental history of Australia. He is an authority on the ecology and conservation of Australian mammals, and is the author of a book on the effects of people on Australian mammals from prehistory to the present day. He and his colleagues have carried out a large body of work on the role of Dingoes in sustaining biodiversity in Australian ecosystems; this work was recognised with a prestigious Eureka Award in 2013.  Chris has also played an important role in AWC's feral cat research program and our research in relation to threatened and endemic mammals in the Artesian Range

David Lindenmayer
David Lindenmayer

David Lindenmayer is a Professor of Ecology and Conservation Biology at the Australian National University's Fenner School of Environment and Society, an Australian Research Council Laureate Fellow, and the Director of Long-term Ecological Research Network. He has published widely (over 545 peer-reviewed scientific papers, and 38 books) on a wide range of topics associated with forestry, woodlands, wildlife and biodiversity conservation and ecologically sustainable natural resource management. David was made a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Science in 2008 and was awarded a DSc in 2003 by the Australian National University. He has been awarded two Eureka Science Prizes (in 1999 and then 2010), six Whitley Awards for his books, and the 2011 Serventy Medal from the Royal Australasian Ornithologists Union. In 2004, he was awarded the leading Principal Investigator by the international Earthwatch Institute, plus also the Australian Natural History Medallion by the Field Naturalists Club of Victoria, Inc. in recognition of his contribution to nature science over the last decade. The Society for Conservation Biology recognized his work with an International Award in 2008. He was awarded the Order of Australia in 2014.

John Woinarski
John Woinarski

John Woinarski has engaged in research, management and policy relating to the conservation of Australian threatened species for over 40 years. He currently works as a Professor in the Research Institute for the Environment and Livelihoods at Charles Darwin University and with the NESP Threatened Species Hub. He has authored more than 200 scientific papers, chapters and books including, in 2014, The Action Plan for Australian Mammals. His work has been recognised by the Eureka Prize for biodiversity research (2001), the Serventy Medal for life-time contribution to Australian ornithology (2001), the Northern Territory Chief Minister’s Award for Research and Innovation (2008), the Australian Natural History Medallion (2011) and the Society for Conservation Biology Distinguished Service Award (2013).  John has been an advisor to AWC for more than a decade.

Stephen Garnett
Stephen Garnett

Stephen Garnett is Professor of Conservation and Sustainable Livelihoods at Charles Darwin University. He is known principally for his work on Australian threatened birds, having written three Bird Action Plans in the last 25 years and, in 2014, the first climate change adaptation plan for Australian birds. He has also worked with communities in far north Queensland and South Australia as a conservation practitioner. He has a particular interest in the benefits threatened species can bring to the human communities in which they live and much of his work in recent years has been on the interactions between biodiversity and livelihoods both in Australia and the broader Asia-Pacific. In November 2014 he was appointed a Councillor for birds with the Convention on Migratory Species.  Stephen played an important role in relation to AWC's ground-breaking research on Gouldian Finches.

Hugh Possingham
Hugh Possingham

Hugh Possingham is an Australian Research Council Laureate Fellow, Fellow of the Australian Academy of Sciences and Director of two national research centres.  Since the 1990s he has pioneered research into how decision science tools from mathematics and economics can bring rigor and efficiency to conservation decisions.  His group’s software has been used to rezone the Great Barrier Reef and to design many of the world’s systems of protected areas. Hugh has co-authored over 500 refereed scientific publications and been a primary supervisor for 69 PhD students and 58 honours students. He has held a variety of broader public roles, advising policy makers and managers; this includes being a founder member of the Wentworth Group of Concerned Scientists. He has one known psychological disorder, a compulsive desire to watch birds.

Alan Andersen
Alan Andersen

Prof Alan Andersen is a Chief Research Scientist with the CSIRO Land and Water Flagship, and a Professorial Fellow at Charles Darwin University. He has been Officer-in-Charge of CSIRO's Tropical Ecosystems Research Centre in Darwin for 16 years. He leads CSIRO's Tropical Savannas research, which aims to provide the scientific basis for delivering environmental, social and economic benefits to northern Australia.  His main research interest is the biogeography and global ecology of ant communities. He has also played a key leadership role with CSIRO's research on savannna burning, which addresses the biophysical, economic, policy and anthropological issues relating to savanna fire management for Greenhouse gas abatement, especially on Aboriginal lands. Dr Andersen has published six books and more than 180 scientific papers; his h-index is 35, and his work has been cited more than 4,000 times by other scientists. He received the 2000 Far East Economic Review Asian Innovation Award, and was an inaugural member of the NT Research and Innovation Board. In 2009 he was awarded the Charles Darwin Medal for Research and Innovation in the NT for his contributions to science and science leadership.

Andrew Cockburn
Andrew Cockburn